Captured from Spain

This one could represent originally 80 gun Spanish ship Fenix later captured and named HMS Gibraltar (albeit temporary name tag reads differently at the moment). Ship is a bit generic in terms of color and layout – I am not 100% sure but I have a feeling that the layout nor the design match exactly the Seven Years War Spanish design (or mid 18th century), but one from a later period – something that were sailing, or remaining in harbor about 1805 and around. Of course, many vessels stayed in service for a long periods and 30 to 50 years were hardly anything unusual and modifications were common.


As 80 gun ship of the line of Spanish navy, Fenix was launched in 1749, hulked in 1813, and finally broken up in 1836. Her last battle under Spanish command was the Battle of Cape St. Vincent on Jan 16th, 1780 under command of Juan de Langara.

Captured during the battle, British commissioned her shortly after as a 3rd Rate, under name HMS Gibraltar and she fought in East India station in the Battle of Cuddalore 1783 under command of Sir Richard Bickerton.


This 80 gun ship of the line, currently sailing under British flag is highly likely the last 1:1200 vessel where I elect to use wash for effect – it does look all right from a distance, but closer one gets, more messy the painting becomes. Clearly washes work better in larger scales.

I am still in doubt wether to include running rigging or not – at the moment I am inclined to keep only the standing rigging because it adds some clarity but that may change in future. I did also experiment with various water effects to create waves for transparent base in order to have more functional bases  for hex based systems such as Close Action but not really sure if that is right way to go – certainly I have to work out way to give more volume to the waves…

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